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The only mention of reflectorized vests or jackets in the Occupational Health and Safety Act is under Section 91(2) of Regulation 91-191. It states: “An employer shall provide, and all signallers shall wear, a reflectorized vest or jacket when controlling the flow of traffic.” At this time, the regulation does not specify the colour of the reflective shirts, nor the colour of the reflective striping. Although not incorporated into the regulation, CSA Z-96.1 – Guideline on the selection, use and care of high-visibility safety apparel can be used in selecting reflective clothing.


Date: July 11, 2018

Supervisors and employers must develop and enforce safety policies fairly and equitably. Supervisors should be educated and trained on how to recognize possible impairment and how the workplace policies should be applied.

Common signs and symptoms of impairment – from cannabis use or other forms of drugs and alcohol – include the following and may help the early identification of an employee who might need help.

These signs and symptoms alone or in combination do not necessarily mean that somebody has a substance use problem and the signs are different from person to person. But they may be indicators that your employee is in trouble or in need of aid.

This list includes the main signs, but there may be others.

Physical: poor appearance/hygiene, sweating, headaches, tremors, diarrhea, restlessness, slurred speech, unsteady gait

Psychosocial: mood fluctuations, inappropriate verbal or emotional responses, irritability, confusion, memory lapses, isolation, lack of focus, lying

Performance: calling in sick frequently or working more overtime, arriving late/leaving early, extended breaks, errors in judgment, deterioration in performance, non-compliance with policies, changes in quality of work


Date: June 14, 2018

The Issues Resolution Office (IRO) provides an opportunity for a review of claim-related decisions or an investigation of service-related complaints. Guided by the principles of impartiality, fairness and service excellence, the IRO is committed to working with our clients in a timely, responsive, and open manner to try to bring resolution to their issues. The IRO is staffed by a manager, an administrator, four internal review specialists, and a client service specialist. The IRO members are trained in administrative justice through the Foundation of Administrative Justice. The IRO reports to WorkSafeNB’s corporate secretary and general counsel.

Review and appeal


Date: May 22, 2018

If you feel you have been treated unfairly or disrespectfully, you can file a complaint to the IRO by:

  • Completing the Issues Resolution form and forwarding it to the IRO at WorkSafeNB at:
    1 Portland Street,
    P.O. Box 160,
    Saint John, N.B.
    E2L 3X9
  • Contacting the IRO directly by phone or email. 1 800 222-9775 (option#5)

Date: May 22, 2018

If you disagree with a claim-related decision, you can request a review by the IRO by:

  • Completing the Issues Resolution form and forwarding it to the IRO at WorkSafeNB at:
    1 Portland Street,
    P.O. Box 160,
    Saint John, N.B.
    E2L 3X9
  • Contacting the IRO directly by phone or email. 1 800 222-9775 (option#5)

Date: May 22, 2018

Jack Callaghan, a professor in University of Waterloo’s department of kinesiology, has found that the ideal sit-stand ratio lies somewhere between 1:1 and 1:3. It is recommended that you begin using your standing desk slowly − start with 20 minutes at a time. Also make sure you’re using a gel mat. 

The ideal is to listen to your body. The key to success in any sedentary workplace is to avoid staying in the same position for extended periods of time.


Date: May 15, 2018

The OHS Act requires the employer to post a copy of the OHS Act and regulations, which include:

First, you should note that WorkSafeNB accepts "electronic" postings for the Act and regulations, provided that workers have easy access to these documents. WorkSafeNB has a web link to all of its OHS legislation, readily available for anyone with Internet access.

In addition, you also need to post the joint health and safety committee (JHSC) minutes and the names of the JHSC members or health and safety representatives, as well as any code of practice established or adopted by the employer.

With respect to First Aid Regulation 2004-130, you are required to post an emergency communication plan, the names of your trained first aiders and signs indicating the location of first aid kits.

The posting requirements outlined in General Regulation 91-191 are task-specific. They can be found in sub sections 51(4), 76(3), etc. You should review the regulations to determine which ones apply to you.

In summary, WorkSafeNB will accept electronic access of the Act if:

  • all reasonable steps are taken to keep the computers in active working order,
  • paper copies of the legislation and other required documents are made available on the request of an employee, and
  • training is provided in accessing computer-stored information to the affected employees including members of the joint health and safety committee, if any, or a health and safety representative, if any.

Date: April 17, 2018

Legislation under the Occupational Health and Safety Act requires every employer with 20 or more employees regularly employed at a place of employment to have a JHSC. Although it refers to ‘place of employment,’ the requirement is specific to an individual employer. If employers in a building are not related – like a commercial complex with many small retail outlets – then we would not require a JHSC for that workplace, provided none of the employers has more than 19 employees. In your case, even though the owner of the two firms is the same, we would not require a JHSC if they have different employer names and numbers.


Date: March 26, 2018

Under the Workers’ Compensation Act, all employers with three or more workers at any time during the year must register for coverage with WorkSafeNB. These workers may be full-time, part-time, casual workers or non-registered contractors, subcontractors or brokers. This is referred to as mandatory coverage. Exception: an employer in the fishing industry must register for mandatory coverage when 25 or more workers are employed. Employers with fewer than three workers can apply for optional coverage.


Date: March 26, 2018

First, you need to determine whether or not your workplace requires an eyewash station. If the answer is yes, then Sections 11(1) and 11(2) of Regulations 91-191 apply. The regulation requires employers to provide emergency showers or eyewash fountains when a worker’s skin or eyes may come into contact with harmful chemicals. It also requires the shower or fountain comply with the requirements of ANSI Z3 58.1-1990, American National Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment, or an equivalent standard. This standard describes the specifications and requirements for emergency eyewashes and showers in New Brunswick. Our Emergency Showers and Eyewash Stations Guide and poster may also be helpful.


Date: March 26, 2018

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