2019 Conference Program

WorkSafeNB is committed to promoting healthy and safe workplaces for New Brunswick’s workers and employers. With more than 25 workshops addressing current health and safety issues and trends, WorkSafeNB’s Annual Health and Safety Conference is designed to appeal to everyone.

Conference Program (PDF)

Highlights

REGISTRATION
Register for the conference and tour the trade show.
Wednesday, October 9, 4-8 p.m.
Thursday, October 10, 7-10 a.m.
Level 1

TRADE SHOW
Tour the trade show Wednesday through Thursday to learn about health and safety products and wellness services and opportunities.

For more information on the trade show or the exhibitors, please contact our trade show co-ordinator at michelle@accentevents.ca or at 506 636-1110.
Wednesday, October 9, 4-8 p.m.
Thursday, October 10, 7 a.m.-3 p.m.
Levels 1 & 2

CONFERENCE WELCOME RECEPTION
Join us for an informal reception where you can network with other conference delegates. Enjoy delicious food and entertainment in a relaxed atmosphere and be there to win great door prizes!
Wednesday, October 9, 5-8 p.m.
Levels 1 & 2

SAFETY STAR AWARDS (Simultaneous Interpretation)
Join colleagues and friends as we salute New Brunswickers who make workplace health and safety a priority and inspire others to do the same. The annual WorkSafeNB Safety Star Awards recognizes three individuals and one organization that lead by commitment, action and example.
Friday, October 11, 8:15-9:15 a.m.
Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D

Start Your Day

Keynote Speakers

OPENING PLENARY WITH ADAM KREEK
OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALLIST, ADVENTURER AND EXECUTIVE COACH (Simultaneous Interpretation)
Adam Kreek

After capturing the gold medal in men’s rowing at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, Canadian Adam Kreek set his sights on an even more daunting challenge – attempting the first ever trans-Atlantic row from mainland Africa to North America. But despite years of planning and preparation, 73 days and more than 5,000-kilometres into the odyssey, the boat capsized in the Bermuda Triangle – just 1,370 km short from his goal.

An energetic and engaging speaker, Adam has shared pivotal lessons of leadership from Olympic sport, adventure and entrepreneurship with audiences across North America. His insights on both great successes and bitter failures will not only increase your effectiveness in professional and personal realms, it will change the way you live your life.
Thursday, October 10, 9-10:15 a.m.
Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D

CLOSING PLENARY WITH AMANDA LINDHOUT
BESTSELLING AUTHOR, EXPERT ON RESILIENCE, SURVIVAL AND OPTIMAL MINDSET (Simultaneous Interpretation)
Amanda Lindhout

After being abducted by a group of masked gunmen while working as a freelance journalist in Somalia, Amanda Lindhout spent 460 days as a hostage, surviving on strategy, fortitude and hope in the face of unimaginable adversity.

A captivating and unforgettable speaker, Amanda’s emotional and powerful testimony about her captivity and subsequent challenges of living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder will leave you inspired to take on challenges with a new perspective. In her keynote, Amanda will show you how to strengthen your resilience by using coping strategies and provide you with actionable takeaways that will empower you to face challenges.
Friday, October 11, 11 a.m.-noon
Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D

SESSIONS AT A GLANCE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10

MORNING SESSION 10:30 a.m.-noon

  1. Young and New Worker Safety
  2. Hand-arm Vibration – What do I Need to Know?
  3. Workplace Privacy – Rights and Obligations of Workers and Employers (French)
  4. Effective Joint Health and Safety Committees in Your Workplace
  5. It’s How We Work – The Surprising Science Behind Getting Your Best Work Done (S.I.)
  6. Drinking, Drugs, Driving and other Death-Defying Deeds (S.I.)

AFTERNOON SESSIONS, PART 1 1:15-2:45 p.m.

  1. Common Gaps in Workplace Health and Safety Programs
  2. Safety Implications to Workers During Emergency Events
  3. Workplace Violence & Harassment Regulations (French)
  4. WHMIS 2015 has Arrived – Are You in Compliance?
  5. Creating a Psychologically-Safe Workplace (S.I.)
  6. Early and Safe Return to Work Panel Discussion (S.I.)
  7. The Changing World of Workplace Drug Testing

AFTERNOON SESSIONS, PART 2 3-4:30 p.m.

  1. Workplace Violence & Harassment Regulations
  2. Noisy Workplace? Hearing-Loss Prevention
  3. Effective Joint Health and Safety Committees in Your Workplace (French)
  4. Shaping Canadian Safety Standards
  5. Decriminalized Marijuana – One Year Later (S.I.)
  6. The Myth of Multitasking – How to Find Focus in a Distracted World (S.I.)
  7. Early and Safe Return to Work – Best Practices

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11

MORNING SESSION 9:30-10:55 a.m.

  1. Workplace Privacy – Rights and Obligations of Workers and Employers
  2. Harassment Complaints – Investigate or Mediate?
  3. Common Gaps in Workplace Health and Safety Programs (French)
  4. Working to Well – Create Your RTW Program Before an Injury Happens!
  5. Keeping a Multicultural Organization Safe (S.I.)
  6. Safety Leadership – How the Art of Storytelling can Affect a Positive Health and Safety Culture (S.I.)
  7. Silica, Not Just Dust


All sessions are in English, unless otherwise noted as French or Simultaneous Interpretation (S.I.)

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

1. Young and New Worker Safety

More than a thousand young workers are injured at work each year in New Brunswick. Young workers and new workers can have unique needs depending on their age, personal development, and work experience. Participants will learn how to keep young and new workers safe through training and supervision, and can share their experiences and discuss views on best practices in young worker injury prevention.

Jessica MacDonald, Business and Community Engagement Co-ordinator, WorkSafeNB

2. Hand-arm Vibration – What do I Need to Know?

Hand-held equipment such as chain saws or jackhammers can be a source of excessive vibration. Exposure to excessive vibration can result in injuries and diseases such as vibration white finger, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and carpal tunnel syndrome. In extreme cases, these injuries and diseases can lead to permanent impairment of the hands and arms. This workshop will focus on the regulatory requirements for daily exposure limits and the components for developing a code of practice to prevent vibration-related injuries.

Evan Campbell, Engineer Compliance and Regulatory Review, WorkSafeNB

3. Workplace Privacy – Rights and Obligations of Workers and Employers (French)

This session will provide an overview of the rights and obligations of employees and employers with regards to privacy in the workplace, touching on topics such as access to medical information, testing, monitoring and surveillance. The session will also look at WorkSafeNB’s obligations under the Right to Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Personal Health Information Access and Privacy Act and what that means in terms of how it collects, uses and discloses personal information.

Anik Cormier, Associate Legal Counsel, WorkSafeNB

4. Effective Joint Health and Safety Committees in Your Workplace

Is your joint health and safety committee (JHSC) effective? Is it meeting its legislative requirements? This session will outline the elements that contribute to JHSC effectiveness and review the latest legislative changes and what they mean for your JHSC. Please come prepared to share your successes and challenges.

Caroline Graham, Education Consultant, WorkSafeNB

Keynote:

5. It’s How We Work – The Surprising Science Behind Getting Your Best Work Done (S.I.)

In an age of disengagement, distraction and fatigue, it seems how we work isn’t working. Michelle Cederberg shares new research that will help change that. She explores how we can work better through four science-backed success factors that will help you get your best work done:

  • Why we work.
  • How we work it.
  • How we own it.
  • How we sustain it.

We’ll explore the inter-relatedness of these four success factors, and what you can do to get the best out of yourself and your team in all you do.

Michelle Cederberg, Speaker, Author, Coach and Consultant, Live Out Loud, Inc.

6. Drinking, Drugs, Driving and other Death-Defying Deeds (S.I.)

We all face risk ? at home, at work, and at play. How do alcohol, medications, recreational drugs, infrastructure design, and culture impact our risk of injury or illness? And how can we, as a society, reduce those risks?

Dr. Paul Atkinson, Chief Medical Officer, WorkSafeNB

7. Common Gaps in Workplace Health and Safety Programs

Good safety culture doesn’t happen by accident. Workplaces need to plan to achieve it. Health and safety programs are organized written action plans that can help prevent workplace accidents and occupational disease by identifying and controlling hazards, defining responsibilities and responding to emergencies. The objective of a program is to integrate health and safety into all work behaviours and conditions. Safety programs are required under the OHS Act for New Brunswick workplaces with 20 or more employees. Find out where many workplaces fall short in preparing their health and safety programs, learn about best practices in addressing the gaps and for preparing and maintaining workplace safety programs.

Lisa Waugh, Health and Safety Consultant, WorkSafeNB

8. Safety Implications to Workers During Emergency Events

During large-scale provincial and local emergencies, workers can be exposed to unfamiliar and often difficult situations where they must be mindful of additional risks. This session will explore a variety of hazardous situations that arise during complex emergencies, and how intelligent leadership and dedicated safety supervision can mitigate their potential effects. The focus will be on recent provincial disasters, more specifically ice storms and floods. We will also discuss the provincial responsibilities in the event of a nuclear incident.

Greg MacCallum, Director of New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization, Department of Public Safety, Government of New Brunswick

9. Workplace Violence & Harassment Regulations (French)

New legislation on workplace violence and harassment came into effect April 1. The changes protect New Brunswick’s workers from a wider range of hazards and require all provincial workplaces to develop a code of practice to prevent workplace harassment. Every New Brunswick employer must also conduct a risk assessment for violence and, based on certain criteria, may also be required to develop a code of practice to prevent workplace violence. Learn about your rights and obligations, what defines violence and harassment, what you need to know to be in compliance.

Christien Goguen, Education Consultant, WorkSafeNB

10. WHMIS 2015 has Arrived – Are You in Compliance?

How well do you know WHMIS 2015? WHMIS has been law in Canada for more than 30 years and in February 2015, WHMIS was updated to incorporate the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). Learn about WHMIS requirements, tools and resources. Through facilitated dialogue and exercises, participants will discuss common questions about WHMIS 2015 and will get practical guidance for implementation, including the difference between education and training requirements.

Jennifer Dipper, Manager, Training and Education Services, Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS)

11. Creating a Psychologically-Safe Workplace (S.I.)

In 2013, the Canadian Standards Association created the National Standard for Psychological Health in the Workplace. University of Fredericton, with Dr. Joti Samra, created a number of courses that support employee and employer resiliency and psychological health in the workplace. To walk the talk, UFred has strived to incorporate many of the factors to achieve a psychological healthy work environment. During this presentation we will discuss the organizational factors that contribute to psychological health, understand some of the challenges of implementing the standard for psychological health, and explore some of the situations that can present themselves to co-workers and managers trying to achieve the psychologically healthy workplace.

Sheri McKillop, Vice-President, Academics, University of Fredericton

12. Early and Safe Return to Work Panel Discussion (S.I.)

Work is good for physical, mental and social health. It’s especially important for injured workers. Staying at work or early and safe return to work (ESRTW) helps workers heal; it’s a critical part of treatment. ESRTW also has significant benefits for all sizes of workplaces. These include increased productivity, decreased training costs and fewer disability claims. In this panel discussion, we’ll explore the benefits of ESRTW, share the medical evidence supporting it, and provide practical ways for incorporating ESRTW in your organization.

Jason Parker, President and Senior Work Disability Consultant, Centrix Other Panelists TBA

13. The Changing World of Workplace Drug Testing

This session will cover the current state of drug testing in Canada and why there is a fundamental shift from traditional urine-based testing to disruptive oral fluid testing technologies. With the legalization of marijuana, employers are facing more dynamic challenges with drugs and alcohol in the workplace. Addressing these challenges requires multi-pronged strategies, such as testing the mechanism itself. New oral fluid testing technologies, specifically on-site instant screens, are increasingly becoming integral to mitigate workplace drug and alcohol risk.

Learn about the science behind oral fluid testing technologies, how they are integrated within strategies and empowering companies, the difference between how employers and police implement oral fluid testing technologies, as well as available oral fluid technologies today.

Rich Robillard, Managing Director, SBL Testing Technologies

14. Workplace Violence & Harassment Regulations

New legislation on workplace violence and harassment came into effect April 1. The changes protect New Brunswick’s workers from a wider range of hazards and require all provincial workplaces to develop a code of practice to prevent workplace harassment. Every New Brunswick employer must also conduct a risk assessment for violence and, based on certain criteria, may also be required to develop a code of practice to prevent workplace violence.

Learn about your rights and obligations, what defines violence and harassment, what you need to know to be in compliance.

Christien Goguen, Education Consultant, WorkSafeNB

15. Noisy Workplace? Hearing-Loss Prevention

The most common permanent workplace injury is occupational noise-induced hearing loss. There is no visible evidence of a noise-induced hearing loss. It does not hurt as it is occurring and it gradually worsens over time. The effects usually go undetected until long after the damage is done and the injury is permanent. The good news is that it is nearly 100% preventable. This session will provide an overview of the effects of noise, and steps to follow for an effective hearing-loss prevention program.

Michael Sharpe, Audiologist, WHAT Ltd. (Workplace Hearing Assessments & Training Ltd.)

16. Effective Joint Health and Safety Committees in Your Workplace (French)

Is your joint health and safety committee (JHSC) effective? Is it meeting its legislative requirements? This session will outline the elements that contribute to JHSC effectiveness and review the latest legislative changes and what they mean for your JHSC. Please come prepared to share your successes and challenges.

Nicole McLaughlin, Education Consultant, WorkSafeNB

17. Shaping Canadian Safety Standards

The Worker and Public Safety Standards Program has been publishing OHS Standards for more than 70 years, using CSA Group’s accredited standards development process. Currently, there are more than 151 OHS standards, developed by the CSA’s 1,800+ volunteer expert members. More than 70% of these standards are referenced in regulations across Canada, and likely impact workplaces daily. Learn about CSA Group’s Standards Research Program, new standards and editions currently under development, plans for future, and how to get involved in shaping the safety landscape in Canada!

Candace Sellar, Program Manager, Worker and Public Safety, Standards, CSA Group

18. Decriminalized Marijuana – One Year Later (S.I.)

This presentation will explore the workplace lessons that have been learned from nearly a year of legal marijuana. How have workplaces adapted, and what new challenges have arisen? Is there evidence that legal marijuana has increased accident rates inside and outside workplaces? What impact will edibles have when they are made legal for sale?

Matthew R. Letson, Partner, Lawson Creamer

Keynote:

19. The Myth of Multi-tasking – How to Find Focus in a Distracted World (S.I.)

In an era of 24/7 connectedness and ‘nose to the grindstone’ ideologies, multi-tasking has become something of a workplace badge of honour. In fact, it’s often heralded as a ‘work skill’ in interviews and on resumes.

These days overwhelmed with technology and a lack of boundaries between work and the rest of life mean that multi-tasking feels more like a necessity than a choice. The truth is that multi-tasking doesn’t make us more productive; in fact, the exact opposite is true.

This session will:

  • Explore the signs of ‘auto-pilot living’.
  • Look at how multi-tasking impacts productivity.
  • Discuss simple strategies for being more mindful and focused when it matters most.

Michelle Cederberg, Speaker, Author, Coach and Consultant, Live Out Loud, Inc.

20. Early and Safe Return to Work – Best Practices

Return-to-work practices have changed significantly in the past 10 years. Where physicians regularly once wrote “off work” notes on a patient’s first visit after injury, they now consider “stay at work” and gradual or modified return to work as a critical part of treatment. Evidence shows work is good medicine. Businesses are adapting to the changes with flexibility and increased support. Learn about global trends in RTW that are increasingly becoming the standard, and how your organization can achieve a model RTW program.

Jason Parker, President and Senior Work Disability Consultant, Centrix

21. Workplace Privacy – Rights and Obligations of Workers and Employers

This session will provide an overview of the rights and obligations of employees and employers with regards to privacy in the workplace, touching on topics such as access to medical information, testing, monitoring and surveillance. The session will also look at WorkSafeNB’s obligations under the Right to Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the Personal Health Information Access and Privacy Act and what that means in terms of how it collects, uses and discloses personal information.

Margaux Savoie-Connolly, Manager of the Decision Review Office, WorkSafeNB

22. Harassment Complaints – Investigate or Mediate?

Since April 2019, New Brunswick legislation requires that employers develop and implement a code of practice to manage workplace harassment. While conducting investigations may be necessary in certain situations, not all harassment complaints need to be investigated. Investigations can have major negative short-and-long-term repercussions on the workplace and employee relationships. Modern conflict management practices require the employers’ code of practice to include an alternative to investigations with a third neutral party to help employees resolve their issues.

Alain Paulin, Chartered Mediator, Sphera Facilitation Inc.

23. Common Gaps in Workplace Health and Safety Programs (French)

Good safety culture doesn’t happen by accident. Workplaces need to plan to achieve it. Health and safety programs are organized written action plans that can help prevent workplace accidents and occupational disease by identifying and controlling hazards, defining responsibilities and responding to emergencies. The objective of a program is to integrate health and safety into all work behaviours and conditions. Safety programs are required under the OHS Act for New Brunswick workplaces with 20 or more employees. Find out where many workplaces fall short in preparing their health and safety programs, learn about best practices in addressing the gaps and for preparing and maintaining workplace safety programs.

Lisa Waugh, Health and Safety Consultant, WorkSafeNB

24. Working to Well – Create Your RTW Program Before an Injury Happens!

For many employers, workplace incidents are rare – and this is good. On the flip side, however, when an injury happens, employers may not have the tools and know-how to act quickly. Time is critical for both worker recovery and business continuity. Having an effective RTW program in place BEFORE an injury happens will help avoid uncertainty and costly delays. In this session, participants will gain a thorough understanding of safe and early RTW programming and walk away with the confidence and tools necessary to create their own workplace program.

Pam Wasson, Resource Manager, OT/PT/Voc Eval., WorkSafeNB
Pierre Daigle, Team Lead, Claims Management Resources, WorkSafeNB

Keynote:

25. Keeping a Multicultural Organization Safe (S.I.)

Cross-cultural miscommunication often leads to misunderstandings and frustrations, even when everyone involved has the best intentions at heart. In some cases, these misunderstandings can result in near-misses, accidents and, in extreme cases, fatalities. By combining powerful diagrams, insightful (and humorous) anecdote and an interactive experiential exercise, this workshop examines the impact of cultural differences on workplace safety and provides practical solutions that participants can implement immediately in their daily professional activities.

Lionel Laroche, President, MultiCultural Business Solutions Inc.

26. Safety Leadership – How the Art of Storytelling can Affect a Positive Health and Safety Culture (S.I.)

What do NASA, Nike, Microsoft, Motorola, Procter & Gamble, and Kimberly-Clark have in common (besides all being large successful companies!)? They all know the value of storytelling as a leadership tool. They know how to use storytelling to inspire, set a vision, teach important lessons and define and shape the company culture. Find out how, through effective communication and storytelling, you can influence the safety culture at your workplace to drive good behaviours and keep health and safety top of mind.

Nancy Boutcher, Assistant Director, Safety Leadership, WorkSafeNB

27. Silica, Not Just Dust

This presentation will provide an overview of the Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS) dust hazards and regulation changes shaping different industries in Canada and the U.S. You will leave with a better understanding of how to determine and control RCS exposure levels. We will review the option to use engineered solutions like dust reduction systems to limit the RCS exposure to those working with or around concrete.

Maria Para, Field Engineer / Project Manager – Atlantic Canada, Hilti Canada


All sessions are in English, unless otherwise noted as French or Simultaneous Interpretation (S.I.)

DETAILS

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9
4-8 p.m.RegistrationLevel 1
4-8 p.m.Trade Show Levels 1 & 2
5-8 p.m.Conference Welcome Reception Levels 1 & 2

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10
7-10 a.m.Registration Level 1
7 a.m.-3 p.m.Trade Show Levels 1 & 2
7:15-8:15 a.m.Buffet Breakfast Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D
8:15-8:30 a.m.Break Foyer
8:30-9:15 a.m.Opening Remarks Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D
9:15-10:15 a.m.Plenary Session with Adam Kreek Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D
10:15-10:30 a.m.Break Foyer
10:30 a.m.-noon. Morning Sessions – Fredericton Convention Centre
Noon-1 p.m. Buffet Lunch Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D
1:15-2:45 p.m. Afternoon Sessions, Part 1 – Fredericton Convention Centre
2:45-3 p.m. Break Foyer
3-4:30 p.m. Afternoon Sessions, Part 2 – Fredericton Convention Centre

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11
7-8 a.m. Buffet Breakfast Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D
8-8:15 a.m. Break Foyer
8:15-9:15 a.m. Safety Stars Awards Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D
9:15-9:30 a.m. Break Foyer
9:30-10:55 a.m. Morning Sessions – Fredericton Convention Centre
11 a.m.-noon Plenary Session with Amanda Lindhout Pointe Sainte-Anne B-C-D

Download the conference app on your mobile device

To download French app, under Settings select French.

Registration

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!
Register online with credit card

To mail in registration with cheque, print (PDF).

For registration of five delegates or more, call 1 800 999-9775.

REGISTRATION FEE
$350 + HST = $402.50 per delegate. Registration will not be completed until payment is received. This fee includes all meals and breaks, including buffet breakfasts Thursday and Friday, and the Thursday buffet lunch. Delegates are also invited to attend Wednesday evening’s Conference Welcome Reception.

CANCELLATION POLICY
Cancellations received after September 27, 2019, are non-refundable, although we will accept a delegate substitution. To send a substitute, please call: 1 800 999-9775.

Accommodations

Note: All delegates are responsible for booking their own accommodations. Please mention WorkSafeNB’s Conference upon booking to receive these special rates.

Crowne Plaza Fredericton - Lord Beaverbrook (1 866 444-1946)
659 Queen Street
Fredericton, N.B. E3B 1C3
Rooms starting at $159/night

Delta Hotels by Marriott Fredericton (1 888 236-2427)
225 Woodstock Road
Fredericton, N.B. E3B 2H8
Rooms starting at $169/night

Hilton Garden Inn (1 800 774-1500)
620 Queen Street
Fredericton, N.B. E3B 1C2
Rooms starting at $165/night

Find other accommodations in the area.

Contact Us

For more information about the Health and Safety Conference, please contact us:

Email: WorkSafeNB Conference

Telephone: 1 800 999-9775

Mailing address:

WorkSafeNB’s Health and Safety Conference
1 Portland Street, P.O. Box 160
Saint John, N.B. E2L 3X9